Motivations for Health and Lifestyle Changes

Let’s examine two types of motivation: extrinsic and intrinsic. Extrinsic motivation is the type that causes you to do something in order to avoid a consequence,[1] such as motivations for health behavioral changes and exercising to avoid obesity. So in contrast, intrinsic motivation is the type that causes you to do something for your own fulfillment or satisfaction,[2] such as  exercising because to feel the burn. No matter what type of motivation is driving a life-long change, the key to success is self-discipline, which allows you to move past external factors and achieve your goal. Because of this, reasons for sticking to lifestyle health and behavior changes could be:

 

  1. Family and friends:

    We value our relationships and support systems, and making healthy choices can help ensure that you age well and enjoy your time with family and friends. Small, simple tasks such as monitoring your salt intake and being active (even gardening just twice a week!) are steps you can take you maintain a healthy lifestyle.

  2. Lifespan:

    Your health and lifestyle choices can significantly impact your life expectantly. Someone with poorly managed Type II diabetes has a life expectancy of about 75 years. Other conditions also have the ability to impact your life expectancy, unless you can follow the doctors’ orders. Something as simple as taking your medication as prescribed can significantly increase your life expectancy.

  3. Money:

    Being healthier can make you money! While you become healthier, you often need less healthcare, which means that your healthcare costs decline, and you have more money in your pocket. You may not see a significant change in the first year – but as the years go by, if you pay attention to your diet and exercise, you’ll be saving thousands of dollars a year in healthcare costs. Fill out the questionnaire in HealthyCapital to find out exactly how much money you can save!

  4. Body Image:

    We live in an age of body insecurity, largely due to the pervasiveness of social media. According to a study, Katherine Appleton, a psychology researcher at the University of Queens in Belfast, found that it only takes two weeks of moderate exercise to improve someone’s body image.[3] Ultimately, staying committed to healthy lifestyle changes will help improve your self-esteem!

  5. Stress:

    Eating healthy foods and high-intensity exercising can greatly reduce stress. Dietitian have found that Omega 3 fatty acids found in fish such as salmon and mackerel can help.

 

Therefore, there are a variety of personal decisions and motivating factors that can influence your health and lifestyle decisions. From reducing stress levels to lowering your healthcare costs, you can take simple steps to ensure a healthy lifestyle.

 

 

Works Cited

Appleton, Katherine M. “6 x 40 mins exercise improves body image, even though body weight and shape do not change.” J Health Psychol, vol. 18, SAGE Publications Ltd, 2013.doi:10.1177/1359105311434756.

Singh, Karuna. “Nutrient and Stress Management.” Journal of Nutrition & Food Sciences, vol. 6, 2016., https://www.longdom.org/open-access/nutrient-and-stress-management-2155-9600-1000528.pdf.

Whitener, Svetlana. “How To Sustain Your Motivation “, April 1, 2019, https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2019/04/01/how-to-sustain-your-motivation/#19e07fe75e6e.

[1] Whitener, Svetlana. “How To Sustain Your Motivation “, April 1, 2019, https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2019/04/01/how-to-sustain-your-motivation/#19e07fe75e6e.

[2] IBID

[3] Appleton, Katherine M. “6 x 40 mins exercise improves body image, even though body weight and shape do not change.” J Health Psychol, vol. 18, SAGE Publications Ltd, 2013.doi:10.1177/1359105311434756.

[4] Singh, Karuna. “Nutrient and Stress Management.” Journal of Nutrition & Food Sciences, vol. 6, 2016., https://www.longdom.org/open-access/nutrient-and-stress-management-2155-9600-1000528.pdf.